| by Jamila Sidhpurwala | No comments

Experiments with Bamboo – sustainable design initiatives with green building materials

Bamboo has been the material of choice in many parts of the World since ancient times. This fast growing plant has all the qualities of a sustainable green building material. It is sturdy, resilient, low-cost and natural. Moreover, bamboo looks extremely attractive, is easy and effective in use, can be grown anywhere and used without causing deforestation. The hollowness of the bamboo stem also imparts natural insulation against heat. Thus, more and more designers are experimenting with bamboo, some even tagging it as a material of the future.

Bamboo Veil House in Singapore by Wallflower Architecture
Bamboo Veil House, Singapore by Wallflower Architecture_PC. Mark Tey photography_Retrieved from Archdaily
Side view of Bamboo Veil House in Singapore
Bamboo Veil House, Singapore by Wallflower Architecture_PC. Mark Tey photography_Retrieved from Archdaily
Bamboo Veil House Bathroom
Bamboo Veil House, Singapore by Wallflower Architecture_PC. Mark Tey photography_Retrieved from Archdaily

Furniture, blinds, partitions, cots, mats and artefacts are made with bamboo since a long time in India. Yet, the material still hasn’t received its due credit in mainstream interior or exterior design. In the above example, Wallflower Architecture has used bamboo as a ‘Veil’ for a contemporary house in Singapore. The Bamboo Veil house features a bamboo facade, designed as vertical fins which can be turned or rotated giving the modern house a natural element. This bamboo veil provides a breathable facade allowing natural ventilation and light throughout the day and washing the interiors with interesting shadows. Running along the first level facade, the bamboo curtain allows a porous facade to all parts of the house, a perfect addition to a residence in the tropical climate.

Eclipse House in Bali by Elora Hardy of IBUKU
Eclipse House, Bali, Indonesia by Elora Hardy of IBUKU_PC. Martin Westlake_Retrieved from Elledecor.com
Eclipse House Bedroom
Eclipse House, Bali, Indonesia by Elora Hardy of IBUKU_PC. Martin Westlake_Retrieved from Elledecor.com
Eclipse House Bathroom
Eclipse House, Bali, Indonesia by Elora Hardy of IBUKU_PC. Martin Westlake_Retrieved from Elledecor.com
Eclipse House sit out
Eclipse House, Bali, Indonesia by Elora Hardy of IBUKU_PC. Martin Westlake_Retrieved from Elledecor.com

The Eclipse House in Bali by Ibuku makes the user feel one with nature. This fairy tale residence by designer Elora Hardy makes use of bamboo in every form and for every function. The structure is designed with Black Petung Bamboo, giving it that special hue whereas the interior details are also fashioned with bamboo giving the residence a striking aesthetic. Walls, ceiling and flooring, fixtures and furniture are all natural with minimal carbon footprint making this house sustainable and Eco-friendly. It is interesting to see the ways the material can be molded, twisted and turned to achieve different shapes. This house by Ibuku illustrates the versatility of bamboo.

Origins Lodge in Costa Rica by Patrik Rey + Gaia Studio
Origins Lodge, Costa Rica by Patrik Rey + Gaia Studio_PC. Reiner Alpizar_Retrieved from Archdaily
Ventilation in Origins Lodge
Origins Lodge, Costa Rica by Patrik Rey + Gaia Studio_PC. Reiner Alpizar_Retrieved from Archdaily

Designed by Patrik Rey + Gaia Studio, the Origins Lodge in Costa Rica is inspired by the Colombian architectural typology of circular houses. The design of the lodge is befitting to its scenic setting of the lodge with mountain views and the Lake Nicaragua. The designers have made sure that the lodge stands true in all aspects of sustainability, right from the structure to the interiors. The house is supported by structural bamboo and has adobe walls for moisture resistance and a floating roof to ensure natural ventilation. The house is surrounded by nature and the design team have added plants to further blend the lodge in the landscape. The crisp joinery and meticulous details further emphasizes Bamboo’s practicality and applications.

Nuilea Spa in Madrid by Zooco estudio
Nuilea Spa, Madrid, Spain by Zooco estudio_Retrieved from Contemporist
Dongshang restaurant in Beijing by Imafuku Architects
Dongshang restaurant, Beijing by Imafuku Architects_PC. Ruijing Photos_Retrieved from Archdaily
Walk area in Dongshang restaurant
Dongshang restaurant, Beijing by Imafuku Architects_PC. Ruijing Photos_Retrieved from Archdaily

Apart from being structurally and environmentally sound, bamboo has a lot of advantages if used in interiors. It is an inexpensive and easily available material which imparts a natural feel to any space. The Nuilea Spa in Madrid designed by Zooco estudio encashed on the material to give the Spa a natural, earthy and light appearance. Imafuku architects designed the Dongshang restaurant in Beijing with bamboo cladding and false ceiling features. Relying on a natural material for furniture, cladding, false ceiling and partitions, reduces carbon footprint, prevents felling of trees, reduces the budget for any project and most importantly is another step towards saving the environment. Experiments with bamboo are essential in the coming times if we are to replace high carbon emission materials like cement and steel. Architects and interior designers should feel socially obligated to build sustainably using green building materials to set an example and make crucial efforts to save the planet.

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